Constellations

"My thoughts are stars I cannot fathom into constellations" This is something I find true so my blog is mostly reblogs of quotes and poems that seem to have been fathomed for me.


hello, peaches! i am doing a little giveaway for all of the support that i’ve been shown! 
as you can see, the rules and the prizes are stated pretty clear, but to further the details.
1st place winner is able to go through my entire archive of photographs on my blog (or if they want to see more) as well as my paintings/illustrations. for the photograph, you can pick any photograph that you want! as well as painting/illustration. if you want something else, just tell me and i can create something new for you (which will only apply to art print)
here are most of my photographs,
here is a small portion of my amateur artwork
everything else is basically self-explanatory, but when the time comes, or even if there are questions now, i will be happy to answer!
this will be posted here and there for one week, so reblog/like whenever you can before the week is up!
thank you for all of your love and support!! you are all such peaches!!!

Reblogged from mostlyfiction

hello, peaches! i am doing a little giveaway for all of the support that i’ve been shown! 

as you can see, the rules and the prizes are stated pretty clear, but to further the details.

1st place winner is able to go through my entire archive of photographs on my blog (or if they want to see more) as well as my paintings/illustrations. for the photograph, you can pick any photograph that you want! as well as painting/illustration. if you want something else, just tell me and i can create something new for you (which will only apply to art print)

here are most of my photographs,

here is a small portion of my amateur artwork

everything else is basically self-explanatory, but when the time comes, or even if there are questions now, i will be happy to answer!

this will be posted here and there for one week, so reblog/like whenever you can before the week is up!

thank you for all of your love and support!! you are all such peaches!!!

"why does it hurt so much when you love?"

Asked by Anonymous

2wentysixletters:

you know, i don’t think it’s supposed to.

"Most humans are never fully present in the now, because unconsciously they believe that the next moment must be more important than this one. But then you miss your whole life, which is never not now."

Reblogged from sonofthelandlockedmariner

Eckhart Tolle (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: liberatingreality)

"This rhetoric of “both sides” implies that pain and fault belong equally to Palestinians and Israelis. It erases manifold, unmistakable, qualitative and quantitative differences at play in Israel’s attack on the Gaza Strip and the political-historical context in which this is taking place — most centrally, that what is occurring is part of a settler-colonial invasion.

“Both sides” rhetoric refuses to make even the easiest, most obvious judgment, to which any honest evaluation of the information points: that Israel is massacring Palestinian adults and children, 77% of whom are civilians, and subjecting them to collective punishment; that Israel evidently claims for itself a right to extra-judicially execute anyone who it says is a Hamas member, a practice too few among even Palestine’s allies have denounced; that Israel is bombarding what is essentially a giant refugee camp home to an imprisoned population of a people Israel has ethnically cleansed, occupied, subjected to apartheid, and repeatedly slaughtered; that international law does not grant Israel a “right to defend itself” against the Gaza Strip. And that international law does grant Palestinians a right to resist using armed struggle.

To employ “both sides” rhetoric completely misrepresents the situation. It is not “both sides” who take thousands of political prisoners. Both sides do not systematically torture each other. Both sides do not control each other’s freedom of movement, or access to the sea, drinking water, and education."

Reblogged from 33113

Greg Shupak - "A Plague on One House" via Jacobin Magazine

In addition to these distinctions, the “both sides” idea is dangerous because it is immobilizing. With its use, it becomes impossible to demand an end to colonial practices. And that is exactly the point.

(via 33113)

(Source: mizoguchi)

"I feed my pen
not ink,
but sorrow,
and the biggest
misconception is
that to keep me writing,
I must keep my sadness."

Reblogged from thewritersaddress

thewritersaddress. (via thewritersaddress)

america-wakiewakie:

What White Privilege Looks Like When You’re Poor | The Nation
Inevitably, when you talk about white privilege someone will ask the question, “What about poor white people? What privilege do they have?”
In January 1961, John F. Kennedy was inagurated as the nation’s thirty-fifth president. In February 1961, he signed an executive order for a pilot food stamp program, one based on the model previously used during the Great Depression. During his campaign, Kennedy had spent much time in West Virginia, and according to his speechwriter Ted Sorensen, “was appalled by the pitiful conditions he saw, by the children of poverty, by the families living on surplus lard and corn meal, by the waste of human resources…. He called for better housing and better schools and better food distribution…. He held up a skimpy surplus food package and cited real-life cases of distress.” Kennedy saw people in need and used his power as president to address their crisis.
This week, the House Appropriations Committe released a draft of the 2015 Agriculture Appropriations bill. In it, $27 million is budgeted for a pilot program aimed at reducing child hunger in rural areas. “Sounds innocuous enough,” writes MSNBC’s Ned Resnikoff, “except the $27 million program was actually the committee’s substitute for a White House proposal which would have allocated $30 million to child hunger across urban and rural areas.”
Resnikoff goes on to point out that this doesn’t mean children in urban areas will be completely left out of hunger reducing programs, as the “federal government spends hundreds of millions of dollars on the Summer Food Service Program, which provides meals to low-income children when school is not in session and they don’t have access to free or reduced school lunch,” and that there are specific challenges that face rural areas with regards to food insecurity. However, “the House committee’s proposal is likely to help fewer people of color than the White House proposal. And while rural areas may be unique in terms of the challenges they face, they’re not where most of America’s hungry are concentrated.”
They’re also among the whitest. “The Appalachian region,” which is where this money would go,writes Talking Points Memo’s Sahil Kapur, “is also more white (83.5 percent) than the United States overall (63.7 percent), according to the Appalachian Regional Commission—and much more so than urban areas, which have a disproportionately high share of minorities.”
It’s not that Kennedy or this current House subcommittee ever explicitly said “white hunger is more important than black hunger, white poverty is more important than black poverty.” But the seeming indifference toward black poverty, played out in their actions as elected officials, reflects the privileging of whiteness. It is indecent that any person go hungry, particularly in a country of such abundance. It is indecent to determine that some of those people are more worthy of our investment in their being fed than others. It is indecent to then pretend as if that’s not the case. All these indecencies add up to an injustice. We are a country that practices injustice as a way of life.
Yes, you can be poor and white and still benefit from white supremacy. That’s what privilege is.
(Photo Credit: Reuters/Rick Wilking)

Reblogged from reverseracism

america-wakiewakie:

What White Privilege Looks Like When You’re Poor | The Nation

Inevitably, when you talk about white privilege someone will ask the question, “What about poor white people? What privilege do they have?”

In January 1961, John F. Kennedy was inagurated as the nation’s thirty-fifth president. In February 1961, he signed an executive order for a pilot food stamp program, one based on the model previously used during the Great Depression. During his campaign, Kennedy had spent much time in West Virginia, and according to his speechwriter Ted Sorensen, “was appalled by the pitiful conditions he saw, by the children of poverty, by the families living on surplus lard and corn meal, by the waste of human resources…. He called for better housing and better schools and better food distribution…. He held up a skimpy surplus food package and cited real-life cases of distress.” Kennedy saw people in need and used his power as president to address their crisis.

This week, the House Appropriations Committe released a draft of the 2015 Agriculture Appropriations bill. In it, $27 million is budgeted for a pilot program aimed at reducing child hunger in rural areas. “Sounds innocuous enough,” writes MSNBC’s Ned Resnikoff, “except the $27 million program was actually the committee’s substitute for a White House proposal which would have allocated $30 million to child hunger across urban and rural areas.”

Resnikoff goes on to point out that this doesn’t mean children in urban areas will be completely left out of hunger reducing programs, as the “federal government spends hundreds of millions of dollars on the Summer Food Service Program, which provides meals to low-income children when school is not in session and they don’t have access to free or reduced school lunch,” and that there are specific challenges that face rural areas with regards to food insecurity. However, “the House committee’s proposal is likely to help fewer people of color than the White House proposal. And while rural areas may be unique in terms of the challenges they face, they’re not where most of America’s hungry are concentrated.”

They’re also among the whitest. “The Appalachian region,” which is where this money would go,writes Talking Points Memo’s Sahil Kapur, “is also more white (83.5 percent) than the United States overall (63.7 percent), according to the Appalachian Regional Commission—and much more so than urban areas, which have a disproportionately high share of minorities.”

It’s not that Kennedy or this current House subcommittee ever explicitly said “white hunger is more important than black hunger, white poverty is more important than black poverty.” But the seeming indifference toward black poverty, played out in their actions as elected officials, reflects the privileging of whiteness. It is indecent that any person go hungry, particularly in a country of such abundance. It is indecent to determine that some of those people are more worthy of our investment in their being fed than others. It is indecent to then pretend as if that’s not the case. All these indecencies add up to an injustice. We are a country that practices injustice as a way of life.

Yes, you can be poor and white and still benefit from white supremacy. That’s what privilege is.

(Photo Credit: Reuters/Rick Wilking)

studentsforaffirmativeaction:

Because white women are the primary beneficiaries of affirmative action, but no one calls that “special treatment”. #RaceMatters

Reblogged from vteck

studentsforaffirmativeaction:

Because white women are the primary beneficiaries of affirmative action, but no one calls that “special treatment”. #RaceMatters

"The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind-the-scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel."

Reblogged from iloveyouthisssmuch

Steven Furtick (via illness-to-wellness)

Word…Facebook lives aren’t real life!!

aslantedview:

The world would be a better place if we treated our mortal enemies like this

Reblogged from aslantedview

aslantedview:

The world would be a better place if we treated our mortal enemies like this

Reblogged from awriterandnothingelse

fotojournalismus:

Airstrikes in Gaza | July 2014

1. An Israeli activist carries a placard during a protest against the war on the Gaza strip, in the Israeli city of Tel Aviv on July 9, 2014. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Smoke and flames are seen following an Israeli air strike in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Reuters)

3. Palestinian relatives mourn during the funeral of members of Hamad family in the town of Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

4. Palestinians inspect the remains of a car which was hit in an Israeli air strike in Gaza City on July 9, 2014. (Ashraf Amrah/Reuters)

5. Relatives of eight Palestinian members from al-Haj family, who medics said were killed in an early morning air strike that destroyed at least two homes, mourn during their funeral in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip on July 10, 2014. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

6. A picture taken in Gaza City on July 10, 2014 shows a damaged building after it was hit by an Israeli air strike. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

7. A Palestinian woman runs carrying a girl following an Israeli air strike on a house in Gaza city on July 9, 2014. (Majdi Fathi/Reuters)

8. Two boys stand near damage caused by Israeli warplanes in Gaza on July 10, 2014. (Yasser Qudih/NurPhoto/Corbis)

9. Israelis watch as smoke rises after air strikes across the border in northern Gaza on July 8, 2014. (Amir Cohen/Reuters)

10. A Palestinian boy plays in the rubble of a destroyed house the day after an Israeli strike in the town of Beit Hanoun, northern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

"You get a strange feeling when you’re about to leave a place. Like you’ll not only miss the people you love but you’ll miss the person you are now at this time and this place, because you’ll never be this way ever again."

Reblogged from 5ft1

Azar Nafisi  (via 5ft1)

#relevant #soon

(Source: vacants)

"Don’t let the mixed signals fool you. Indecision is a decision."

Reblogged from sonofthelandlockedmariner

24 (via itsallgoodbabyba-by)

(Source: angelicareni)

"I still miss you but
I am done missing out on
Life waiting for you"

"The capacity to be alone is the capacity to love. It may look paradoxical to you, but it’s not. It is an existential truth: only those people who are capable of being alone are capable of love, of sharing, of going into the deepest core of another person — without possessing the other, without becoming dependent on the other, without reducing the other to a thing, and without becoming addicted to the other. They allow the other absolute freedom, because they know that if the other leaves, they will be as happy as they are now. Their happiness cannot be taken by the other, because it is not given by the other."

Reblogged from hilan

Osho  (via mrsfscottfitzgerald)

Still learning this…

(Source: quotes-shape-us)

"It’s nice that I’m the one
to cross your mind when
you can’t sleep or when
you’re lonely or quiet; there
are people who would kill
to be the name that flashes
in the dark. But I still think
of you in crowds; I still
think of you in daylight."

Reblogged from sonofthelandlockedmariner

Anne, afterthought (via anneisrestless)